On behalf of Robert W. Keller Attorney At Law posted in Criminal Defense on Wednesday, April 26, 2017. Were you recently arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol? Do you have reason to believe that you did nothing wrong? Do you feel that you are being charged with a crime that you did not commit? Regardless of your situation, a DUI conviction can have a major financial impact on your life. Fortunately, just because you are charged with driving under the influence it does not mean that you will be convicted. Instead, there are steps you can take to protect your legal rights and put this in the past without too much of an impact. Even a first offense […]

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On behalf of Robert W. Keller Attorney At Law posted in Criminal Defense on Thursday, March 16, 2017. The Massachusetts murder trial involving former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez serves as a reminder of how tattoos can be used to help convict defendants. Using tattoos in criminal trials isn’t a new concept. They often serve as circumstantial evidence that can help convince a jury of facts that aren’t easy to prove. For example, gang tattoos are often introduced into evidence because they can show gang allegiance or rank. Some gang members even get tattoos to symbolize crimes they’ve committed or even time spent in prison. A lot of these symbols are well-known to law enforcement and can be used […]

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On behalf of Robert W. Keller Attorney At Law posted in Criminal Defense on Friday, March 3, 2017. It doesn’t matter if you call it operating while intoxicated or driving while intoxicated, nothing changes the fact that this is extremely dangerous. When you’re under the influence of drugs or alcohol, it’s best to stay out of your vehicle. Getting behind the wheel can lead to a serious crime that lands you in hot water with the authorities. Just because you are arrested for operating while intoxicated does not mean that you will be convicted. If you are, however, the court can hand out the following punishment: — First offense: a six to nine month license suspension, along with a fine […]

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